What is Ubuntu One?

19 10 2010

Canonical, creator and developer of Ubuntu and Ubuntu One, have offered it’s Linux users a valuable cloud computing service with Ubuntu One. Currently in public beta form, Ubuntu one is a full suite of cloud computing software that you can use to integrate your OS and your cloud with Evolution Mail for contacts or Tomboy for notes, as well as any other arbitrary files you find valuable.  Granted Canonical has been taking some heat due to the fact that as of yet, there is no Kubuntu Support for this product, and the closed source-code for the server-side of Ubuntu One, but most of all, the fact that you are paying for this service.  A very out of character decision by Canonical, who traditionally offer everything for free, and under the GNU License open-source agreement.

Ubuntu One starts off with a basic package, which allows you to have 2GB of free storage space.  There is also a paid Ubuntu One service which gives you 20GB extra for $2.99 a month.  You can add as much space as you want, always in increments of 20GB for $2.99 a pop.  Really, not a bad deal.  Especially when you take into account just how much ease of access and quality of service Ubuntu is offering with the Ubuntu One service.  The seamless integration with Ubuntu 10.04 Lucid Lynx is just amazing.

There is also a DRM free mp3 music store integrated with Ubuntu One, where you can purchase your music, and listen from almost anywhere.  This is where the mobile plan comes into play.  For $3.99 a month, or $39.99 for the year, you can enjoy a mobile Ubuntu One experience with unlimited music streaming from your Cloud to your Android device or iPhone.  Once you activate your account, search for the application in your App Marketplace, download and install.  There is also immediate contact synchronization for most any phone on the market today, not just Android or iPhone.  Right now Canonical is offering the mobile platform for a 30-day free trial.

Fortunately there is a Windows Beta coming soon for all of you dual-booters out there as well.  This is where Ubuntu one becomes the most valuable of services is because so many Linux Users will dual boot their computers with a copy of both Linux and Windows.  Now you will be able to rather seamlessly adjust files from one OS to the other with as little legwork as possible.  Something that a lot of newbies making the bridge over to linux will find rather convenient, rather than regularly finding you have to restart your computer to gain access to that file again.

Overall, Ubuntu One seems to possess a whole lot of potential.  Although it will definitely take some heat due to the fact that it does come with some cost to really use the services full potential, it is just that, a service.  The best part is, you don’t have to pay if you don’t want to. Just head on over to the site and try the free 2GB package they are offering, and start forming your cloud today!

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