What is Ubuntu One?

19 10 2010

Canonical, creator and developer of Ubuntu and Ubuntu One, have offered it’s Linux users a valuable cloud computing service with Ubuntu One. Currently in public beta form, Ubuntu one is a full suite of cloud computing software that you can use to integrate your OS and your cloud with Evolution Mail for contacts or Tomboy for notes, as well as any other arbitrary files you find valuable.  Granted Canonical has been taking some heat due to the fact that as of yet, there is no Kubuntu Support for this product, and the closed source-code for the server-side of Ubuntu One, but most of all, the fact that you are paying for this service.  A very out of character decision by Canonical, who traditionally offer everything for free, and under the GNU License open-source agreement.

Ubuntu One starts off with a basic package, which allows you to have 2GB of free storage space.  There is also a paid Ubuntu One service which gives you 20GB extra for $2.99 a month.  You can add as much space as you want, always in increments of 20GB for $2.99 a pop.  Really, not a bad deal.  Especially when you take into account just how much ease of access and quality of service Ubuntu is offering with the Ubuntu One service.  The seamless integration with Ubuntu 10.04 Lucid Lynx is just amazing.

There is also a DRM free mp3 music store integrated with Ubuntu One, where you can purchase your music, and listen from almost anywhere.  This is where the mobile plan comes into play.  For $3.99 a month, or $39.99 for the year, you can enjoy a mobile Ubuntu One experience with unlimited music streaming from your Cloud to your Android device or iPhone.  Once you activate your account, search for the application in your App Marketplace, download and install.  There is also immediate contact synchronization for most any phone on the market today, not just Android or iPhone.  Right now Canonical is offering the mobile platform for a 30-day free trial.

Fortunately there is a Windows Beta coming soon for all of you dual-booters out there as well.  This is where Ubuntu one becomes the most valuable of services is because so many Linux Users will dual boot their computers with a copy of both Linux and Windows.  Now you will be able to rather seamlessly adjust files from one OS to the other with as little legwork as possible.  Something that a lot of newbies making the bridge over to linux will find rather convenient, rather than regularly finding you have to restart your computer to gain access to that file again.

Overall, Ubuntu One seems to possess a whole lot of potential.  Although it will definitely take some heat due to the fact that it does come with some cost to really use the services full potential, it is just that, a service.  The best part is, you don’t have to pay if you don’t want to. Just head on over to the site and try the free 2GB package they are offering, and start forming your cloud today!

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Best Android Apps

15 10 2010

Ah, Android love.  It is time to review some of the best and brightest offered in the Android Market today.  Some are pretty mainstream, but hopefully we can turn you on to a couple you either haven’t found, or have just been too hesitant to try.  The Android Marketplace, available through the nifty little icon, is a veritable sea of technological wonders.  One of the nice things about Android, and also HTC, is the usability of widgets.  Some nifty little programs that will display and work from any one of your, usually, seven home screens.  So without further ado, let’s get started.

Scan any of the barcodes below with your android phone to be taken to the download for that app in the Android Marketplace.  If you don’t have a barcode scanner, Search for Shop Savvy in the Marketplace and install it.

 

 

Advanced Task Manager

One pesky thing about Android is that fact that a lot of applications like to run in the background.  Most phones off of the shelf, or android for that matter, doesn’t come with any type of Task Manager to help moderate these pesky battery hogs.  So that is where advanced task manager comes in.  You can use the whole app and browse running programs and erase the ones desired, or you can do as I install the single-icon widget and with the press of a button all running apps are eradicated.  At any given time usually about 9 are running at once, but it can get up to around 24, so you gotta stay on it.

 

 

 

HandCent Text Messenger

Handcent is an alternate text messaging application that will take over for the stock version in your phone.  In my opinion, this app supersedes my Hero’s capabilities, and adds a nice iPhone looking skin on the messages.  It offers push notifications that will show over your lock-screen (not good if you like to keep secrets, but you can disable it) which also let you respond from there.  There are roughly seven or so font-packs you can use to spice up your messages, as well as a ton of other tweaks.

 

 

 

EasyTether

EasyTether is a super-convenient app that allows you to connect your phone via USB cable to your PC and “tether” the internet.  Essentially, your computer borrows your phones 3g connection, for free.  There is a paid version as well, but EasyTether Lite gets the job done fine for basic quick computing and just surfing the net.

 

 

 

Where

Where is an awesome app that is not only on Android, but should definitely get mentioned.  This nifty little package will show just about where anything is.  As well as offer the best gas prices in your area, peoples reviews on certain places, weather, etc.  Its really a useful app for someone who is on the move.

 

 

Photobucket Mobile

Most people know what Photobucket is, but if you don’t, it is a image hosting site on the internet.  Basically they store all of your pictures for free, unless you have A LOT of pictures.  The Photobucket app is super useful because if you have a phone with a decent camera, which lots of phones have nowadays, it’s a really convenient way to share these photos online.  Once you snap a picture, Photobucket will then upload that saved picture to your Photobucket account, allowing you to set up slideshows, post on websites and forums, or upload to Facebook, if your phone doesn’t do it already.

 

 

TuneIn Radio

This nifty little app lets you listen to damn near any radio station across the country.  Through which you can get down to the most local of stations, or browse the NPR options.  The quality is crystal clear, and the user interface is a breeze to navigate.  For free, this little app packs a punch.

 

 

 

 

 

gStrings

No, its not an x-ray machine, this is a fully featured guitar tuner offered for free in the Android Market.  This app is better than most any entry to mid-level guitar tuner out there, and its free.  Really a great steal.  Not to mention the way your friends will look at you when you pull out your phone to tune your guitar.

 

 

 

 

 

Notable Mentions:

– 3 (Cubed): if you’re going to listen to music on your phone, why not make it a 3D interactive cube to browse and play it with.

– Google Voice

– Thinking Space:  Mind Mapping software.  Awesome for writers.

– Spectral Analyzer:  A spectrometer.  Good for finding ghosts, or where that mouse is behind the wall.

– Metal Detector:  Uses your phones built in antenna to detect metal.  I didn’t believe it at first either.





Android Apps for Beginners

13 10 2010

Ah the magic and beauty of the Android OS.  Thanks in part to big name phone makers such as HTC, Motorola, and Samsung all hopping on the bandwagon we have this iPhone.  As hardware potential climbs, the sheer beauty of the things you can accomplish with this software are becoming more and more apparent in our everyday lives.  The apps available for download in the Android Marketplace, most of them free, some paid, are a testament to just how far we can go with this relatively new technology, and show that the sky is the limit with quality services to be offered, aka Google Sky Map.

To the beginner, Android, or even a touch screen phone for that matter, can seem like somewhat of a daunting task to take on.  But once you get your feet wet, and start having some fun, pulling your fingers away from the screen will get harder and harder.  One of the largest appeals for these new phones is the availability, and usefulness, of Applications.  There is a vast sea of apps out there for you to dabble in within just about every genre you can imagine.  Finding these apps is made possible by the Android Marketplace.  A preexisting app that comes with your Android phone.

Due to the sheer amount of apps out there, it is hard to differentiate which ones will be the most useful for most people, so we will just go ahead and focus on a few of the most fun.

1. Google Sky Map

Google Sky Map is an innovative App that utilizes your GPS positioning, and the camera on your phone to view stars, planets and constellations in our immediate galaxy.  The sheer scope of this app is impressive, but its simplicity is what makes it fun for all ages.  Using your screen as a viewfinder you can point the camera on your phone is any direction and get an accurate mapping of the stars, constellations and planets.  A really fascinating and fun way to look at our world, and learn.

2. Layar

Layar is in essence, very similar to Google Sky Map.  One major difference is, it focuses on our planet. More so, on your immediate surroundings.  Again utilizing your camera, and global positioning, you can use your phone as a viewfinder, and look around your immediate area to find shops, restaurants, stores, or landmarks.  Say you’re in downtown Chicago, and you want to find a nearby pizza place.  Launch Layar, specify pizza, and just look through your phone.  If you rotate in a circle Layar will show you precisely whereeach establishment is, correlating rather efficiently with your local surroundings, And offering reviews to help you decide which place is best to have lunch.

 

3. Pandora

For those of you who don’t know, Pandora is an online radio that thinks.  It learns what you like to listen to, and then plays music, new or old, that fit into your interests.  Having this app on the go, especially when you are tired of your iPod library, can be super useful, and fun.

 

 

4. Radar Now

Radar Now is a live streaming app of your local weather radar.  When you launch the App it zeros in on your general location, and will display a live feed of the Doppler radar within about a 500 mile radius.  This app comes in super handy, especially if your an outdoorsy person.

 

 

 

5.  Shop Savvy

Shop Savvy is another app that utilizes the camera and viewfinder on your Android powered phone.  It turns your phone into an effective bar code scanner.  Just point the camera, wait for the scan, and see all of the products and reviews that this app will bring up.  Maybe not very essential in the grocery store, but if you find yourself at Best Buy searching for a new digital camera of LCD TV, this app will help find reviews and pricing info on the fly.  In essence,

making you the most educated shopper you can be.

This is just scratching the surface of valuable resources available in the Android Marketplace.  Once you start exploring, its hard to stop.  My suggestion is, get out from under that rock, invest in a new phone, and find out just what the fuss is all about.





Free Drawing & Graphic Software

13 10 2010

As the onset of Open Source software has been making more headway in the past couple of years, there is a bounty of quality free software around for anyone to try on for size.  Some more notable than others, but most are very well made products, and regularly updated through a small army of programmers.  The most common license for these products is the GNU General Public License, but there are other, less notable licenses as well.  This licensing ensures the quality and trustworthiness of the products you will be using in the future.  Anyone who has spent some time with the Linux operating system will be familiar with most of this.  If you are not familiar with Linux, get familiar.  Without further ado, let’s get listing!

1. GIMP – The GNU Image Manipulation Program

http://www.gimp.org

GIMP is essentially a full on Photoshop alternative, and it is 100% free.  I use gimp for almost all of my graphic design, and you can save your files in Adobe friendly formats that allow you full functionality with any Adobe suite or products you may already own.  This program runs much more efficiently than adobe in my opinion, I just enjoy the interface more.  Sure, there are some shortcomings that you just cannot ignore, such as the sheer quality edge and color detection you have in Photoshop, but if this is not essential for you, then why bother.

2. Blender – model – shade – animate – render – composite – interactive 3d

http://www.blender.org

Blender is a quality 3D modeling platform, also created under the GNU license.  It can be used for creating everything from 3D models and smoke simulation to creating animated films or video games!  Quality wise, Blender stacks up to other comparative programs, aka Maya and 3D StudioMax, rather well.  Sure it is limited in lack of Font Preview for text, lack of N-gon-based modeling workflow and some missing modeling tools.  It also is on the leading edge with advanced algorithms utilized for its UV unwrapping.  Basically, compare the price tag of Maya or 3D Studio to Blender and you definitely get what you don’t pay for.

Just a sample of what Blender can do:

 

 

3. Google SketchUp

http://sketchup.google.com/

Sketch up is essentially a simplified AutoCAD.  It has some one-dimensional aspects to it as well, and you can build houses for display in Google earth.  The simplicity lies in the interface, and the projects really just seem to come together.  I downloaded it on a whim, and wound up losing hours to trying to recreate my home, and building my dream one.  With some nice snap-to options, and a fun scaling platform, its worth the download.  And hey, who doesn’t trust Google?

This is really just scratching the surface of quality free drawing, image manipulation, and 3D modeling software out there, but if I had to pick, these are my top three.  Once you get into open source, or Google for that matter, it can be really hard to quit.  Hopefully this can help send you down a long and happy road of new, healthy computing options.